Man Says There's No Scientific Basis Behind 'She Loves Me, She Loves Me Not'

Written by Monkey Woods

Monday, 10 June 2019

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A man who knows about stuff like this, has said there is absolutely no scientific basis whatsoever behind the ages-old petal-pulling decision-making theory of

"She loves me, she loves me not..."

The practice of pulling individual petals from a flower - usually a daisy - whilst chanting the above mantra, in order to determine whether or not someone you like holds a similar level of affection for yourself, is very much hit-and-miss.

A person playing this 'love game' says one half of the phrase, 'She loves me...', and pulls a petal. Then, speaking the second half of the phrase, 'she loves me not', pulls another. This is repeated until all petals have been removed from the flower's head. The part of the phrase being spoken as the last petal is pulled, is supposedly the one that proves whether or not the object of the petal-puller's affection loves him.

But it's a load of old codswallop.

Moys Kenwood, the man who knows about stuff like this, said:

"The theory is completely without scientific basis. It is based wholly on chance - it's either one or the other - and has no realistic value. One might as well toss a coin!"

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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