Uno Stacko Box Is Slowly Disintegrating

Written by Monkey Woods

Thursday, 7 May 2020

image for Uno Stacko Box Is Slowly Disintegrating
Not long for this world - the Uno Stacko box earlier

A game used by an English teacher in Thailand to dupe his students into thinking they were enjoying their 'learning experience', has come under fire after its thin card packaging started to collapse.

Uno Stacko, a Jenga-style game with the added excitement of Uno, comes packaged in a box the shape and size of the 3x3-stacked plastic bricks inside it. Once the box is carefully turned upside-down and lifted off, the stack of bricks is ready for play.

Or are ready for play, if you'd prefer.

When the game is over, players stack the brick column again, and carefully place the box over it for safe and easy storage.

In theory, that is.

In reality, of course, card has a tendency to lose its 'sturdy' quality over a longer period of time, and to revert to being what its main constituent really is - paper.

When that happens, getting the game back into the box properly becomes rather more difficult than the game itself.

The teacher concerned, Moys Kenwood, said:

"The box tends to get slung to one side as the students get excited over who is going to be first, and it often gets sat on, knelt on, or even trampled."

Several attempts have been made to repair the box by 'strengthening' it with sellotape, but the card has become so flimsy that, nowadays, Kenwood just chucks the bricks into a plastic bag when he's finished, and has the students build the stack themselves, each time they want to play.

"It wastes so much more valuable time," he explained.

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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