Written by SpoofyDoofy

Friday, 10 September 2010

image for Japanese 'quantitative easing', 77,000 people aged 120 or over, 884 aged 150 or higher, claiming pensions!
Japanese pensions help the economy to quantitatively ease.

Toyko, Japan: Japanese authorities have revealed that it has thousands of people listed as still alive, who have been dead for years.

More than 77,000 people aged 120 or over - 884 aged 150 or higher - are listed on government records as still alive.

More than 230,000 Japanese people listed as 100 years old cannot be located and many may have died decades ago, according to a Government survey released today.

The survey found that more than 77,000 people listed as still alive in local government records would have to be aged at least 120, and 884 would be 150 or older.

The survey uncovered 234,354 Centenarians who are listed as still alive, but whose addresses could not be confirmed. Ministry officials suspected some deaths went unreported in the confusion that followed the end of the second world war, while other people may have lost touch with relatives or moved overseas without informing the authorities.

In order to help Japans flailing economy, families have been deliberately hiding the deaths of elderly relatives and getting their corpses mummified, in order to 'patriotically' claim their dead relative's pensions, as way of quantitative easing.

Already Gordon Brown is attempting to get the Japan's form of quantitative easing, written into the Labour Party Manifesto, especially when their postal votes will all be for the Labour Party at future General Elections.

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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Topics: Old People, Japan




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