Written by queen mudder

Sunday, 23 September 2007

image for Bluetooth sues over Bluetongue slurs
Bluetooth unhappy about Bluetongue allegations

Bellevue, Washington - (Cyberspace Mess): The Bluetooth Special Interest Group is suing the UK's Agriculture Ministry over reported slurs linking it to an outbreak of the mad cow disease-related bluetongue virus.

The Bellevue-based industrial wireless specification association is said to be in uproar over British claims that the insect-borne livestock virus has been spread "by mad cow disease-infected wi-fi geeks" using personal area networks (PANs).

"As a radio standard and communications protocol mostly designed for low power consumption, there is no way any of our low-cost transceiver microchips could be spreading this crap," a SIG PR source said today.

"Besides, as far as we know it, British cloven-hooved livestock such as sheep, cattle, goats and deer, aren't renowned for their I-Pod use or mobile technology interests," the spokesman continued.

The rumors started when UK TV news reported that "some old cows" had been overdoing it with their MP3 players recently and had developed "discomfort with flu-like symptoms and swelling and haemorrhaging in and around the mouth and nose" according to a lunchtime bulletin today.

"Some have also gone lame and had difficulty eating properly," the broadcast also claimed.

But Bluetooth SIG is adamant that those symptoms are not necessarily synonymous with over-indulgence of its microwave associated technology:

"Sounds like some of those little cows are simply suffering the effects of too much glue sniffing and crystal-meth intake," the Bellevue source added.

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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Topics: bluetongue




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