Dementia Risk Rises If You Read Misleading Headlines

Funny story written by Dewani Unhatched

Wednesday, 17 February 2021

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People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.


People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.
People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

People who read misleading news articles have an increased risk of dementia, according to research that adds to concerns about the impact of the news media on the nation's mental health.

Roughly one in 10 cases of Alzheimer’s in urban areas could be associated with reading news articles, similar to this one, the study estimated – although the research stopped short of showing that exposure to articles written by this author causes neurodegeneration.

Hong Chen, the scientist who led the work at Public Health Ontario, said:

“Increased access to the internet has placed many people with social media accounts, and with widespread exposure to fake news and growing rates of dementia, even a modest effect from this type of exposure could pose a large public health burden.”

A recent study suggested that magnetic nano-particles from the stress caused by reading articles like this can make their way into brain tissue. This can result in the reader repeatedly reading the article, unaware that they are continually absorbing the same information in a weird sort of loop.

The funny story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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