Written by JAB

Tuesday, 30 November 2010

image for Australian WikiLeaks is put on the Endangered List
Home of WikiLeaks, Endangered Species

Townsville, Queensland - Thought to be extinct, since the 1970's, WikiLeaks, discovered by Australian national Julian Assange has been put on the endangered list. The WikiLeaks (Whistlus Blowerwus), native to Australia, is known to have been to Kenya, Tanzania, Iceland and as far north as Sweden.

While, it is rarely seen, it nevertheless can be quite destructive, especially, if you are in the path of its droppings. They can cause an allergic reaction to some and even be poisonous to others. Reports of their alleged damage to Iraq and Afghanistan this past summer have yet to be determined.

Sweden says, WikiLeaks attacked and harassed two different species this past summer in Stockholm. Swedish officials would like to see WikiLeaks for themselves to determine whether it's capable of inseminating other species. Australia has not said whether they would be willing to give up WikiLeaks, now that it's on the endangered list.

WikiLeaks is believed to be a distant cousin to another 'Leak' species native to the United States. In the 1970's Daniel Ellsberg discovered the Pentagonus Papyrus .This species primary habitat, was Washington, DC. Its origin was South East Asia, primarily Vietnam though its droppings affected Cambodia, Laos and North Vietnam. It was believed to be such a threat to the United States in the early 1970's, that it became a constitutional issue.

As regards WikiLeaks, the Australian government has given no hint as to what it plans to do other than to stress that, "Australia is playing only a supporting role, while, the U.S. is taking the lead."

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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