Jesus' Fingerprint Found on Tombstone

Written by trythisathome

Friday, 3 August 2007

Hey!

The story you are trying to access may cause offense, may be in poor taste, or may contain subject matter of a graphic nature. This story was written as a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

If you wish to back out now, please click here to go back to the home page.

image for Jesus' Fingerprint Found on Tombstone

The fingerprint of a person called Jesus Nazareth has been found on an ancient stone in Rome.
However the Jesus that this particular print is connected to, is that of a cult leader and criminal.

Cold Case file detectives have been working on the case for thousands of years. One Detective told us: "I just want to die to be honest. I was 36 when I started this investigation. I am now 304."

The police have so far linked the print to a known thief who stole thousands of fish from local fishmongers and hundreds of loaves of bread from a local baker.

According to police source's the guy was "gaga" and that insanity ran in the family. His mother allegedly believed she conceived him without any sexual involvement. His uncle claims to have built an arc of wood and carried 2 of each sex & of every species of animal for 40 days & nights. His Cousin offered his own son as sacrifice and the entire past family begatt each other. Over & Over again.

"Truly it is disgusting." concluded the detective.

The print of Jesus of Nazareth is to be sent to a professor at the University College London, for study.

The professor told us: "Uh Oh! This kind of shite can cause a war."

The AWBOR (Against War Based On Religion) told us: "Hahahahahahaha!"

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

Do you dream of being a comedy news writer? Click here to be a writer!

Spoof news topics



Mailing List

Get Spoof News in your email inbox!

Go to top
readers are online right now!
Globey, The Spoof's mascot

We use cookies to give you the best experience, this includes cookies from third party websites and advertisers.

Continue ? Find out more