Ron Paul Promises to Remove the 'No' Symbol from the Constitution

Funny story written by Cal Jennings

Friday, 18 May 2007

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Ron Paul Promises to Remove Red "No" Symbol

CCN (Crazy Cal News) - The Republic of Texas - Republican Ron Paul promises that, if elected, he will remove the "No" symbol from the Constitution that President Bush had placed there.

Ron Paul, the only traditional Republican in office, refuses to subscribe to the Bush Nazi Party, and has come under harsh criticism from President Bush and the Neocon Republican Party who stand by and support President Bush.

The Neocon Republicans have bribed and threatened every news media outlet on television and on the "Internets" to try to keep Ron Paul off the air, but Paul's supporters seem to keep popping up all over the web.

TheSpoof.com reporters were approached and had their lives threatened, but not one single writer at TheSpoof.com was smart enough to understand that they were being threatened. The result is that TheSpoof.com writers have written even MORE articles against the Bush Nazi Party, thinking that the Neocon Republicans just wanted some attention.

"Heck, I didn't know," said Cal Jennings. "I thought someone was just shootin' buzzards outside my window. What do I know? I'm just a dumb ex-Texan West Virginian."

Ron Paul esimates that it will take 1/1,000,000,000th of the Iraqi War budget to remove the red symbol from the Constitution. He'll spend what's left over on helping the needy, improving education, creating jobs, and intends to use a small portion to help pay TheSpoof.com writers and fund some of the best damn home-grown you've ever seen.

The funny story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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