Written by twylo2000
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Topics: Cards, Playing Cards

Friday, 8 October 2010

The introduction of a new playing card to standard decks is creating a furor among card players, casino owners, psychics, gypsies, 3-car monty dealers and kids with bicycles.

Introduced last week without fan fare, the new card, marked with the letter "F", brings the total count of cards in a deck to 53. The new card is the first addition since playing cards were introduced in Europe over 500 years ago. In addition to adding a card to the count, the new card introduces a new single card suit dubbed "Blue Moon".

Unlike standard cards which are always sized at a 1:2 ratio, the new "Fool of Blue Moons" is square.

"This is absolutely worthless," complained a card player concerning the new deck. "Everybody knows who has it and no one knows when to play it. If they wanted to improve the deck, why didn't they introduce an "oh no you didn't" card or even better a "you lose" card. Those are cards I would want to draw on a regular basis."

Defending its change, the playing card manufacturer's association cited slipping sales over the last several years as the motivation. According to a spokesperson for the association the intent was to make every deck of cards obsolete, forcing the replacement of all existing decks. "An opportunity like this comes around just once in a blue moon," the spokesperson said. "We would be fools to miss such an opportunity."

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The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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