Written by Robert W. Armijo
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Tuesday, 9 October 2007

image for Life imitates "Brazil" (the movie): Supreme Court refuses to hear real life govmt. mistaken identity, abduction and torture case
Supreme Court refuses to hear real life mistaken identity, abduction and torture case; liberty sentenced without a hearing?

Washington, D.C. - In an all too eerie occurrence of life imitating art, today the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear a case of mistaken identity, abduction and torture of an innocent man, a Germany citizen of Lebanese descent, by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Like in that movie, "Brazil," when the government, refused to acknowledge it made a similar mistake to that of the CIA, the judicial branch refuses to acknowledge the same citing secrecy.

In the satirical dark comedy, "Brazil," the government (The antagonist) in an effort to combat terrorism sets up a secret agency, Ministry of Information, that is allowed to abduct and torture suspected terrorist virtually with impunity. While on such an operation to arrest suspected terrorist Mr. Tuttle, it mistakenly abducts the wrong man of a similar name, Mr. Buttle.

Satirical comedy ensues as a kindhearted bureaucrat, Sam Lowery, (The protagonist), Department of Records, attempts to correct the mistake of an entrenched bureaucracy, unwilling to acknowledge it made one in the first place. Somewhat like the Supreme Court turning down the opportunity to hear and rule on the CIA's case of mistaken identity.

Unfortunately, Lowery is too late and discovers Mr. Buttle is dead and eventually, our dear protagonist is doomed to join him (at least in the original version). Fortunately, all similarities between today's Supreme Court announcement, and the movie "Brazil" ends there. So perhaps our future will never be as dark as that depicted in "Brazil".

However, the fact that the Supreme Court cites security over liberty flies in the face of what Benjamin Franklin cautioned against, "If you sacrifice liberty for security, you shall have neither."

Now begs the question without judicial review, how many more such "mistaken identity abductions" are we to expect are looming on the dark horizon like in the movie "Brazil," if the Supreme Court continues to turn a blind eye in future such cases.

For if judicial review is abandoned, there is much doubt as to whether we will ever know the answer to that question. Although it is not originally a rhetorical one in nature, it is no longer pregnant with legitimate inquiry for knowledge and truth, either, for they will have been aborted in favor of that obstinate child, ignorance.

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The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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