Written by Robert W. Armijo
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Topics: Bill O'Reilly

Friday, 28 September 2007

image for Bill O'Reilly dispels his own stereotypes of Black Americans; finds himself in the "No Spin Zone" segment of his own show after reaction
Bill O'Reilly instead finds himself on his own "No Spin Zone." But at least the man is trying

New York, New York - Sharing on his syndicated show the "Radio Factor" his revelation that a dinning experience at a local favorite, Sylvia's, a soul-food restaurant in Harlem with Rev. Al Sharpton this week was no different than any other he could detect from those of Italian restaurants in a White neighborhood, Bill O'Reilly instead finds himself on his own "No Spin Zone" segment of his show the "The O'Reilly Factor."

According to other restaurant patrons that were present that night, O'Reilly sat quietly while eating his own food he brought in a brown paper bag.

"He acted like people do with stereotypes of what an all Black restaurant, I guess," said restaurant patron, Lyon Washington. "He stemmed up all his eating utensils with his breath, rubbed them off his napkins and then carefully inspected his water glass for any spittle. Oh, yeah, he kept saying in a loud voice, 'I lost my wallet today, Al. So I guess you'll have to pickup the check tonight, okay?"

Another restaurant patron confirmed 'The O'Reilly Factor' reaction by trying to act "Black" in order to fit in with everyone else.

"Everyone could tell it was his first time eating there because instead of asking for the house wine list, which is quite good. He asked for a list of the house's best 40-ouncer malt liquors," said Trina Rodriguez. "Then he looked around smiling like he was expecting exterior validation."

It is a shame that in this day and age with all the advancements in America with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that there are people in power like O'Reilly that obvious speak the mind and conscious of the American people by virtue of their popularity and still harbor such backward thinking, civil rights groups say.

Others say Americans are reading too much into it. But point out that it is sad that so many American's have come to formulate their opinions about their fellow Americans and the world on a guy that sadly has not gotten out so much.

He should venture beyond his own circle of friends and out to the rest of America he professes to love so much and confirm or deny the very things he espouses and posits before the nation on almost a daily bases for others to believe, say critics.

"He's just a man," said a close friend of O'Reilly. "He's filled with contradictions just like us all. The man flies across the nation but won't walk a few New York City blocks to sample the local fare and confront the unknown. Please, don't judge him too harshly at least the man is trying."

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