Written by Ossurworld
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Topics: Tom Brady

Tuesday, 3 May 2016

SUPREME COURT-- Tom Brady has loaded up on the big guns. Today he and his defense team at the NFL Players Association have brought in former Solicitor General of the United States, Ted Olson, to join their legal squad.

Olson has a history of going up to the US Supreme Court. If there is a need for experience in this realm, Brady now has hired the best option for the ultimate round. We can see where the yellow brick road is winding.

A few sports hacks have said this doesn't deserve to go to the Supreme Court. If ever an individual's rights have been trod upon, this is the case.

Ted Olson should send shivers down Roger Goodell's staff, but we suspect they never heard of the guy. Tom knows, and that may make the retaining of this lawyer a game changer.

When ownership supported Goodell, they have put billions on the defense-and Brady doesn't want to pay the tribute. It is a historical situation that is a cornerstone of America.

Will the Supreme Court take the case? The clarion call sounds, "Why not?"

The late Justice Scalia would have loved this one.

The Brady suspension may well force Clarence Thomas to speak his mind.

The case boils down to the All-American Boy versus the Billionaire Boys Club. The billionaires ought to be worried about their antitrust exemption clause. Tom Brady speaks softly, but his iron boot is made for walking.

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The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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