Written by queen mudder
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Topics: Google, Fukushima

Friday, 8 November 2013

image for Google's new barge to be deployed in clean-up of Japanese tsunami trash
The scene near San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge today

San Francisco - "Yep, it's a giant Japanese tsunami crap sucker alright," was the latest comment from a San Francisco techie today tweeting about the construction of a massive floating edifice outside Google's San Francisco HQ.

The barge is believed to be part of a $1 billion salvage plan to tackle the one million tonnes of toxic Japanese crap headed for the West Coast following the 2011 nuclear reactor disaster in Japan's Fukushima Province.

Marine psychoanalysts who have studied the phenomenon reckon Google's new super-duper giant floating vacuum barge will be systematically sucking up the foreign debris as it heads ever closer to the coast of California.

The huge marine erection was built in the open air amid great secrecy prompting dozens of suggestions about its possible purpose. [Don't ask!]

Today credible reports from Los Angeles-based celeb fanzine LA FagHagSlagMag.con claimed the 'factory ship' would be pulverizing all the radioactive flotsam and jetsam before returning it as landfill dirt to Japan's National Fukushima Shambolic Nuclear Corp.

Meanwhile the US Meterological Orifice has announced the presence of a powerful new hurricane barreling its way southwards from Hawaii towards Southern California.

Projections state it should make a spectacular conjunction with the floating toxic debris around Sunday lunchtime, Pacific Eastern Time.

Japan's Emperor Aki Shit-Ho is 109.

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The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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