Written by Ellis Ian Fields
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Wednesday, 20 October 2010

image for Hitler & Stalin Bores: Top Academic Slams History Programming
Prof Lucid watches more history programming.

There are too many programmes on TV about Hitler and Stalin says a leading academic.

Overkill on programmes about the twentieth century's dictator-monsters means modern history students are interested in little else.

Prof Ken Lucid slams the current schedules of specialist history channels in his review of the new book Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin, by Timothy Snyder.

In his review, Prof Lucid says: "They have so much time to fill on these channels, do they really have to fill very day with Hitler/Stalin-porn?

"Where's the stuff about the Risorgimento [unification of Italy]? What about the religious wars in France? Is the story of the Holy Roman Empire so beyond them?"

The head of history at Thames Valley East University also argued that programmes like Ice Road Truckers and Ax Men had no place in history programming.

A spokesman for a history-based channel said: "Yes, we know all about Ken Lucid's opinions.

"But he's a history expert and we know about TV. We also run the channel, so what's he going to do about it?

"Hitler and Stalin? The kids love that stuff. And if we want to show programmes about truckers and lumberjacks, we will. So there."

Read Prof Lucid's Review of Bloodlands in the magazine section.

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