Written by queen mudder
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Saturday, 5 May 2007

image for Queen Elizabeth in massive 50/1 chance Imawildandcrazyguy Kentucky Derby gamble
Imawildandcrazyguy seen here in training earlier in the week

Louisville, Kentucky - (Ass Mess): 50/1 Kentucky Derby no-hoper Imawildandcrazyguy has been the subject of a massive royal punt today amid reports that Queen Elizabeth has taken advantage of the ludicrously high pound/dollar exchange rate to back the grey Wild Event - Frosty Cupcake gelding with a whole month's Civil List payments.

The Civil List is the UK's royal equivalent of a social security handout and specifically targets the puppet monarchy's gambling needs during foreign state visits and other daft events bankrolled by the country's taxpayers.

And at Churchill Downs today bookies are rubbing their hands with glee at the prospect of such foreign largesse filling their coffers as the William Kaplan-trained three year old takes his chances under the stewardship of 46 year olf Louisiana jockey Mark Guidry for owners Lewis Pell and Michael Eigner.

A spokesman for the royal party said Queen Elizabeth chose the horse because "she likes the name which reminds her of her yellowcake uranium fantasy Prime Minister Tony Blair who himself is also a 50/1 chance for remaining in his job until this time next week after the cash-for-honors cops have the last laugh on his ten year tenure of Downing Street."

Any Given Saturday remains a steady 12/1 shot.

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The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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