Written by anthonyrosania
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Saturday, 21 August 2010

image for Electric Cars Are Zero Emissions Vehicles? My Ass. "You have to measure the emissions that a vehicle is responsible for, and not just what comes out of it." Everybody's car poops.

"Did you poop?"

"No," my daughter answered. Over her left shoulder I could see a pile of brownish baby exhaust creating a costly stain on an (once) off-white glider in her bedroom.

"Isn't that poop, Miel?"

"Yeah," she answered, scanning my face for a reaction.

One last try: "Miel, did you poop?"

A moment to think, then a brilliant response: Pointing to her diaper, she looked dead in my eyes and said, "No, chair's poopy. Miel's poopy is in here."

I once took the very unpopular position that there is no such thing as a Zero Emissions electric vehicle, stating that they should more accurately be called "remote emissions vehicles."

What Is The General Motors EV1?

The was an electric car produced by GM from 1996 to 1999.[1] It was the first mass-produced electric vehicle, and the first GM car designed to be an electric vehicle from the outset.

So what happened to it?

The EV1 was discontinued in 2002, and all cars on the road were repossessed. Lessees were not given the option to purchase their cars from GM. The majority of the repossessed EV1s were crushed, and the rest delivered to museums and educational institutes with their electric powertrains deactivated, under the agreement that the cars were not to be reactivated and driven on the road.

Assholes.

My argument was simple; you have to measure the emissions that a vehicle is responsible for, and not just what comes out of it. Unless an electric cars is recharged via garage mounted solar collectors, the electricity is coming from a power plant, one most likely powered by coal or natural gas, and therefore MUST be creating emissions. You have to take all of the circumstances involved with MAKING the electricity, and not just where the electricity is finally consumed, into the equation.

Electric cars poop where the electricity is generated, not out of their exhaust pipes. And just because there's no poop in your diaper doesn't mean you didn't poop.

I felt quite vindicated when, in 2006, an Oregon market research firm released a report which claimed that a Humvee (13 miles per gallon) uses less energy than a Prius (48 city). Pound for pound, making a Prius contributes more carbon to the atmosphere than making a Hummer, largely due to the environmental cost of the 30 pounds of nickel in the hybrid's battery.

It certainly was nice that someone got it.

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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