Written by Inchcock
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Monday, 19 December 2011

image for Historical Walks of Ye Olde Nottingham - Around the City Centre The average weekly pay in 1956 UK

A stroll around the Council House of Nottingham.

Recalling and comparing the quaint and individualistic nature of life in Nottingham comparing the three dates, 1890, 1963, and 2011, at the same location.

Long Row East

1890:

As you walk up Long Row East, watching out for the cyclists horse drawn trams, and pigeon pooh falling. On your left is the magnificent fascia of the decorative and gargoyled Watson Fothergill designed Black Boy Hotel, sadly demolished in the late 1960's.

The Old Exchange Building (Council House) with its 'Shambles below, to your right. The Shambles being made up of Flesh Hewers, butchers, poultry-men and fishmongers stalls. No refrigeration, plenty of saw-dust, and crime though.

We turn right at the back of the Council House, onto High Street.

1963:

You walk up Long Row East, watching out for Teddy Boys, and pigeon pooh falling. On your left is the magnificent fascia of the decorative and gargoyled Watson Fothergill designed Black Boy Hotel, to be demolished in 1968.

We turn right at the back of the Council House, onto High Street.

2011:

You walk up Long Row East, watching out for big issue sellers, muggers, pigeon pooh falling, marketeers, and shoplifter being taken out of Primark. Where once stood the Black Boy hotel, now stands the Primark store, that replaced the Littlewood's store, that replaced the hotel, and was looted in the riots. The new Council House with it's many abandoned retail outlets beneath on your right.

We turn right at the back of the Council House, onto High Street.

Along High Street

1890:

On our left, is Boots department store, where carbolic soap was 1d (¼p) a bar, and a cup of tea or coffee was 2d (1¼p) a cup.

A very busy Gauntley's Tobacco shop on our right.

At the end on the left is the Pawnbrokers.

We go right down Smithy Row.

1963:

On our left, it Boots department store, where Camay soap was 4d (1¾p) a bar, and a cup of tea or coffee was 4d (1¾p) a cup.

A busy Gauntley's Tobacco shop on our right.

At the end on the left is a building society.

We go right down Smithy Row.

2011:

On our right, (Boots department store moved into a shopping centre now), is Pret a Manger, where a cup of tea or coffee is £2.10 a cup.

A Gauntley's Tobacco shop on our right.

At the end on the left is Barclay's bank, who were robbed this year, and damaged in the riots.

We go right down Smithy Row, passing the money lenders outlet.

Tram lines in the road.

Smithy Row

1890:

On our right is the entrance to the Shambles, a police station, and council offices.

Tram lines in the road.

On our left, a bustling assortment of retailers, and the very popular Flying Horse Hotel.

On our left as we approach the front of the Exchange Building on our right, we find Exchange Walk, a very busy thoroughfare, with thriving small retailers, match sellers, shoe shiners, with the National Provincial bank on the corner.

Onward, to where Smithy Row turns into South Parade.

1963:

On our right is a variety of retail outlets, a police phone-call box, (like Dr Who's) and council offices.

Trolleybus wires overhead.

On our left, an assortment of retailers, and the very popular Flying Horse Hotel.

On our left as we approach the front of the Council House on our right, we find Exchange Walk, a busy thoroughfare, with small retailers, beggars, boot shiners, with the National Provincial bank on the corner.

Onward, to where Smithy Row turns into South Parade.

2011:

On our right is a variety of closed down retail outlets and charity shops.

New Tram lines in the road.

On our left, an assortment of closed down retailers, charity shops, Job agencies, and replacing the very popular Flying Horse Hotel, an arcade of closed retail businesses.

On our left as we approach the front of the Council House on our right, we find Exchange Walk, a very busy thoroughfare, with small retailers, Big Issue sellers, muggers, and pickpockets, with the Yorkshire bank, where the cash-in-transit men were attacked this year, on the corner.

Onward, to where Smithy Row turns into South Parade.

South Parade

1890:

Grand, tall offices of many a profession line the length of the Parade on our left. The crowded Market Place on our right filled with people and horse and carts.

1963:

McFisheries supermarket, banks, travel agents, and offices line the length of the Parade. The people filled slab square on our right, socialising.

2011:

A pub, bookmakers, internet-cafe, college, Bus offices, and a few abandoned outlets fill the length of the Parade on our left. The people filled slab square on our right, with the Occupy Nottingham residents with their tents, flags, and nub-ends, the potential muggers and Big Issue sellers mix threateningly together.

Nottingham Timeline Snippet;

You can see the three B's of Jazz next year at the Royal Centre in Nottingham. Kenny Ball, Chris Barber and Acker Bilk. I went to see Acker Bilk in about 1965, it cost me a whopping 3/6d (17½p). This time is will cost over £20 for the cheapest seats!

I lived in Nottingham for over 60 years, and never got mugged - now I've been nobled three times in the last five years!

The times, they are a'changin'!

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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