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Monday, 27 September 2010

image for Athens and Sparta History to be Revised
"What, only that many Persians?"

Athens GR: Subway construction in Greece's capitol city has unearthed an amphora containing a historical description written by Moussaka, a historian of the period 490 BC to 431 BC. There is new information about the relations between the Greek-city states of Athens and Sparta.

In 490 BC, the Persian Empire, ruled by king Ahmadinejad the Crazy I, invaded Greece. Athens, Sparta, and other Greek city-states joined forces to stop the Persians at Marathon. The Spartans arrived late, so, the Athenians faced the mighty Persian army alone. Outnumbered considerably, the Athenians fought bravely and defeated the Persians.

In 481 BC the Persians returned under the rule of king Ahmadinejad the Crazy II. This Persian king would not go away quietly! The Athenians and Spartans fought together to halt the invaders. After several defeats, the united Greeks finally smashed both the Persian army and navy.

In 478 BC the friendship between the Athenians and Spartans was beginning to unravel. The leaders of Athens sent their foreign minister Souvlakia to meet with his Spartan counterpart Avgolemono. Together, over goblets of Ouzo the diplomats hammered out a treaty of Mutually Assured Defecation (MAD). A no man's land/demilitarized zone 100 miles wide, called Feta, was established between Athens and Sparta populated by 50 million goats. The Athenians or the Spartans wouldn't dare attack each other, as they would have to get through this neutral zone of ruminant generated methane gas and littered with billions of caprine land mines.

In 431 BC the friendship between the Athenians and Spartans finally ruptured when the Spartans, wrapping their faces and feet in goat skins, began a "tough slog" through Feta. The rest is history! The Peloponnesian War began in 431 BC and lasted until 404 BC, being fought by Athens and its empire against the Peloponnesian League led by Sparta.


(Kudos, REF: Rit Nosotro, Athens and Sparta, hyperhistory.net, Sept 2010)

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