Written by IainB
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Saturday, 30 July 2011

image for Review: More Existential Books Repeating History seemed very familiar.

Just when I thought I'd finished reading all of the Existential books my grandfather had bequeathed me, it turned out I'd read nothing, and there was the box, full to the brim with books I'd not read.

Having previously enjoyed reading the last lot of books I no longer had, I thought I'd give the new box a good seeing to. Armed with nothing more than a million candle storm lantern I had liberated from a lighthouse, I read in short burst separated by momentary darkness.

The first to catch my eye was Nothing from Something a follow up to Something from Nothing. This was a single page with illuminating prose. Every time I turned the page over, there was yet more to learn on the other side. After turning it for an eternity, I decided enough was enough, and put it down, at which point my cat became self aware and got a job as a dishwasher at the Chinese restaurant, it was that good a book.

Having read for an unmeasurable amount of time, it was lucky my next choice was Living Backwards, where I learned that we cannot remember our future because our past is yet to happen. However, I got back my evening, and thus was able to move onto Infinite Me.

I only had to read one page of Infinite Me, despite there being an uncountable number of pages, with the versions of me from other universes all reading a different page we got it read really quickly.

This gave me time to read Repeating History. It seemed vaguely familiar. Much like a book I had read before. Every page gave me the strongest sense of deja vu. This was a shame, as I felt that I knew who had done it just at the point it was revealed who had done it. Very similar to watching a re-run of Quincy on Living TV.

Favourite Existential Quotations included such luminaries as the Pink Panther ("Philosophy is like a bumper sticker without a punchline"), Arthur Askey ("Unintelligible answers to questions we've not asked, something we all need") and Woody Allen ("I know I must exist because so many other people are miserable"). This is a great book to put onto a coffee table when you have invited around people far more intelligent than yourself for a dinner party. Although personally I prefer The Joy of Swinging, but that's not an existential book, and one for another review.

This gave me time to read Repeating History. It seemed vaguely familiar. Much like a book I had read before. Every page gave me the strongest sense of deja vu. This was a shame, as I felt that I knew who had done it just at the point it was revealed who had done it. Very similar to watching a re-run of Quincy on Living TV.

The final book in the box was The Book to End All Books.

It did.

The story above is a satire or parody. It is entirely fictitious.

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